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Thread: Auster near Brest, 1940

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    Default Auster near Brest, 1940

    Hello to all,

    Not an easy querry I’m afraid, but wouldn’t any researcher have in his data base a possible Auster lost near Brest, north of Landerneau, much probably before June 18 1940 ? The crew was safe. Some parts exist, as a big aluminium part that may be a cooling panel, a navigation ruler, and perspex parts.

    Thanks in advance
    Regards
    Gildas

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    Hi Gildas

    I believe the first Auster did not enter service until 1941 so a loss before 18 Jun 1940 couldn't be an Auster.

    Malcolm

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    Many thanks for this post Malcolm! It was my first reaction when I saw the post but I was unable to find out any prove in my sources.

    Gildas - do you have any additional info which may help us to find out what kind of plane it was? How many crewmembers? Biplane or monoplane? One engine only?

    BTW amybe if you will be able to post a link to the photos of parts mentioned in your post it can also help - maybe someone will be able to identificate the type.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Could it have been a pre-war civil Taylorcraft impressed into the RAF for communications duties? This was the basis for the Auster range of aircraft. Google for more - it's a bit complicated!

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    what makes you think it is an Auster?

    I will look up impressements for you but doubt it was a taylorcroft either.

    regards

    Paul

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    From memory, about a dozen Taylorcrafts were impressed in the winter of 1939/1940, and used for liason to France.

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    Hi
    Just a random thought...
    Could it be the walrus of 10 Sqn that crashed near close to Ploudaniel.
    cheers
    Jerry

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    I checked Air Britian Impressments Log...

    While some Impressed Taylorcroft Plus D were sent to France in 1940 for AOP duties, none appear to have been lost

    Paul

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    Default british aircraft, near Brest, 1940

    Dear all,

    Thanks for all your replies and research. Sorry, I should have cared about this possibility the Auster wasn’t in service in 1940. I think we said Auster as it seemed to be a kind of liaison aircraft. I’m curently trying to learn some more about the event. The crash was on what we call a « chemin eux », a path way between two embankments.
    I enclose a link to this picture from 1998 when the remains were displayed in my village for one week. I had no numerical camera at that time, so have only this one for the moment.
    http://s97.photobucket.com/albums/l229/Gildas4044/identifications/?action=view&current=AvionGBCollMvelExpo98.jpg

    This aircraft has nothing to see with the Walrus at Ploudaniel, knowing both crash sites. And I know the crash site of 3 Swordfishs, and one Albacore that are supposed to be the only such aircraft to have crashed or landed around here.
    Albacore L7129, Porspoder 9/10/1940, crew POW
    Swordfish L2748, Plouzané 11/12/40, crew KIA buried Brest
    Swordfish NE906, Lilia-Plouguerneau, 30-4/1-5/44 Crew KIA but buried as unknown at Plouguernau. But note a fourth grave marked for 1st May 1944 « Wilson PLP » that became as the others, « an airman of the 1939-45 war » since the definitive headstones.
    Swordfish NE946, At sea, Landéda, 30-4/1-5/44 Crew KIA buried Brest
    Swordfish NE906, At sea, 30-4/1-5/44 Crew MIA, Leading Airman ROWNTREE Brian Lambert being buriedat Manchester southern cemetery.

    Will keep updated.
    Thanks again for these first steps
    Gildas

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    What you are saying is that some sort of liaison aircraft crashed, around June 18th 1940.

    Do you have any indication that it was specifically RAF, and not a French or German machine, or even a civilian aircraft escaping to England?

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