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Thread: No.207 Squadron, March/April 1943

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    Default No.207 Squadron, March/April 1943

    I am currently looking at two Combat Reports acquired via "Documents on Line". They deal with the following:

    Combat, 29/30 March 1943, Lancaster K/207. Name of pilot obscured by stamp on document but may be "Richardson". Gunners named as Sergeant Booth (rear gunner) and Sergeant McIntosh (mid-upper).

    Combat, 14/15 April 1943, Lancaster A/207. Pilot is Sergeant Richardson. Gunners as above; Sergeant Booth (rear) and Sergeant McIntosh (mid-upper).

    My primary interest is a more complete identifiaction of Sergeant Booth who may (or may not) be Gordon Brant Booth, RCAF, later awarded DFM. If anyone has a copy of (or access to) to ORB of No.207 Squadron, I would appreciate more complete details pertaining to the identity of the men noted above.

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    Hugh,
    Fred Richardson, Pilot.
    Grant Booth, RCAF, Rear Gunner.
    Wallace McIntosh, Mid Upper.
    K-King, ED550, was their usual aircraft.

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    Hugh,
    Further to my previous posting, Grant Booth was awarded the DFC on completion of his tour with 207 Squadron at the end of July 1943. Hope this helps with your identification.
    Bill.

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    Hello Hugh,

    Wallace McIntosh has a biography "Gunning for the Enemy: Wallace McIntosh DFC and Bar, DFM" by Mel Rolfe, this may interest you.

    Regards,

    Ian

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    The MacIntosh biography sounds most interesting and I shall try to consult a copy. Hope that Canada Air Museum library has one.

    Thanks to help on this board, the Booth award data base is now amended to read:

    BOOTH, P/O Grant Gordon (J17928) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.207 Squadron - Award effective 4 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1943 and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943. Born 11 May 1923. Home in Ottawa; enlisted there 30 June 1941 as clerk typist. To No.4A Manning Depot on enlistment. To No.5 Equipment Depot, 18 July 1941. To No.WS, 23 October 1941. Promoted LAC, 25 November 1941. To “E”, 21 February 1942; to No.6 BGS, 28 March 1942; promoted Sergeant, 27 April 1942. To “Y” Depot, Halifax, 28 April 1942. To RAF overseas, 15 May 1942. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 27 October 1942. Commissioned 5 June 1943. Flew two tours. Repatriated to Canada, 23 July 1945. Photo PL-25551L shows F/O G.G. Booth; PL-25551R shows F/L P.M. Anderson. Released 20 September 1945. Rejoined postwar RCAF and served to 1957. Award sent by registered mail 30 September 1948.

    "Pilot Officer Booth has participated in attacks on some of the enemy's most heavily defended targets. On several occasions when his aircraft has been attacked by enemy fighters his coolness and skilful direction not only enabled his captain to frustrate the attacker but resulted in the probable destruction of at least two hostile aircraft."

    British National Archives (ex-Public Record Office) Air 50/237 has the following combat reports related to his career.

    14/15 March 1943: Lancaster A/207; pilot Sergeant Richardson; target Stuttgart.

    On the night of 14/15 March 1943, Lancaster aircraft “A” of No.207 Squadron, while participating in a bombing raid on Stuttgart, was attacked at Amiens at 2350 hours at 16,000 feet on a course of 117 degrees Magnetic with I.A.S. of 170 m,p.h. by a Me.109.

    There was very good visibility with no cloud and moonlight, there was no searchlight or ground cooperation and the enemy aircraft carried no lights.

    The enemy aircraft was first sighted at 400 yards on the starboard beam. The enemy aircraft then made one attack from the starboard, slightly below. The Lancaster’s defensive tactics was a turn into the fighter’s attack. The disposition of the enemy’s armament appearing to be cannon and machine gun.

    The enemy aircraft opened fire at 330 yards and ceased fire at 250 yards on his breakaway to the starboard. The mid-upper gunner [Sergeant McIntosh] and rear gunner [Sergeant Booth] opened fire as soon as the enemy aircraft turned into the attack and ceased fire at 250 rounds. The mid upper gunner fired 400 rounds and the rear gunner 500 rounds.

    No damage was observed to the enemy aircraft and none was received by the Lancaster aircraft.

    The mid-upper gunner, Sergeant McIntosh was trained at 4 AGS with no OTU training and the rear gunner, Sergeant Booth, was trained at 7 AGS and 29 OTU,

    29/30 March 1943: Lancaster K/207; pilot Sergeant Richardson; target Berlin.

    On the night of 29/30 March 1943. Lancaster “K” of 207 Squadron was returning from a bombing sortie on Berlin when an Me.109 made an attack from the port quarter slightly below at Bruck at 0123 hours. The Lancaster was flying at 18,000 feet with an I.A.S. of 165 m.p.h. on heading 236 degrees Magnetic.

    There was moderate visibility with low cloud and a clear sky above; there was no ground cooperation or any unusual phenomena.

    The enemy aircraft was first seen at 200 yards on the port quarter slightly below. The Rear and Mid-Upper Gunners both opened fire at this range and ceased fire at about 100 yards. The enemy aircraft did not open fire at all but was trying to position himself for a burst.

    The Lancaster did a steep turn to port and the enemy aircraft came round on his course of pursuit and broke away on the starboard quarter underneath. The enemy aircraft was claimed as damaged because the tracer appear to go all round the enemy aircraft and with the evasive action taken by the Lancaster the enemy aircraft was not seen again.

    The number of rounds fired from the Lancaster was, Mid-Upper 100 rounds and the Rear Gunner 300 rounds.

    At 0126 hours a Ju.88 was sighted by this same Lancaster at a height of 19,000 feet. The enemy aircraft was first sighted on the starboard beam and he hung off for about one minute. The enemy aircraft then turned in and the Lancaster made a steep turn into his attack; the enemy aircraft flew over the top of the Lancaster and disappeared. No lights were carried by the enemy aircraft and no rounds were fired at either the Lancaster of enemy aircraft.

    The attack seems to have been caused by the Lancaster being silhouetted against the lights of the marker flares. No damage was sustained to the Lancaster aircraft.

    The Rear Gunner, Sergeant Booth, was trained at No.7 AGS and No.29 OTU and the Mid-Upper Gunner, Sergeant McIntosh, was trained at No.4 AGS but did not attend any OTU.

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