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Thread: Q.D.M.'s and TR9.

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    Default Q.D.M.'s and TR9.

    Following is a summation of an operation flown by my father.


    2nd September 1941.

    Take off time 1940 from Lindholme. Hampden 116. Crew, Pilot P/O Carter, P/O Davidson. Sgt. Layne (Wireless Operator) Sgt. Gilmore.

    The crew were detailed to drop vegetables (mines) in the Daffodil (Copenhagen) area. Owing to adverse weather conditions no pin point was obtained and the aircraft returned to base. The vegetables were jettisoned at a position pin pointed as 57 degrees North, 10 degrees East.

    The fuel supply was running low and on reaching Skegness after obtaining a fix and Q.D.M.ís there was only 30 gallons left in the starboard tanks. The intercom and TR9 failed a few minutes later and Waddington could not be heard replying to transmissions.

    On arrival at Waddington the starboard engine cut out and a one engine circuit was carried out. The aircraft crash landed in a dispersal field as the mist prevented the aerodrome from being seen. Total flying time 9.35 hrs.


    I would be grateful if someone could tell me the meaning of "Q.D.M.'s and TR9"

    With thanks, David.

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    For a discussion on QDM

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4581

    TR9 was an early radio transceiver

    A
    RAF Armoured Car Companies 1920-45 http://www.rafacciraq.com/

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    Thanks Amrit, much appreciated.

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    David,
    As pointed out, TR9 (in its many successive variants, such as B, C, D, F etc) was an early RAF radio transceiver. In fact it was the standard R/T set (Radio Telephony, voice only, also linked with "Pipsqueak", or Master Contactor) in those early days pre-IFF. It was fitted in most operational RAF aircraft from Spitfires to Wellingtons for short range voice communications, air to ground and air to air. For longer ranges, W/T (Wireless Telegraphy, or Morse code) was required, although these sets were only fitted (obviously) to longer range aircraft, and for which a trained wireless operator was required for operating these more complicated (and temperamental) pieces of equipment.
    David D

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