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Thread: Dusk and Dark

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    Default Dusk and Dark

    Other than the obvious, what does "Dusk and Dark' mean in the Remarks section of a Flying Log Book?

    My questions pertains to a flight made by 14 OTU Hampden 1294 on 16/6/41. Take off time 2300 from Cottesmore. Pilot Sgt. Holme. Flight duration 1.25 hours.

    My crew members log book lists his duty as both W/O & A.G. This is the first time I have seen both the W/O duty and Gunnery duty listed for one individual on the same flight. How easy was it for the wireless operator and the gunner to change positions in a Hampden in flight?

  2. #2
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    David,

    I'm not sure if this really answers your question but I think the "dusk" in this context is the lingering amount of light left after sunset, and "dark" the time after this light disappears. There used to be a excellent US Navy website for which one could obtain all astonomical details for one day - that is times of sunrise/sunset/moonrise/moonset/end or beginning of twilight etc - all this would be presented on one page for any day in the past or future.

    Unfortunately the website has been changed and, in my view, not for the better since one has to calculate each item separately.

    For definitions of "rise", "set" etc go to http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/astronomical-information-center/rise-set-twi-defs .

    To obtain a WHOLE years values of Sunrise, or Sunset, or etc go to

    http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications/data-services/rs-one-year-world

    Unfortunately, as I said, it does not appear to be possible to obtain all the data for just one day (although I've yet to explore it in depth.

    Brian

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    Dear David
    The Wo/AG in a Hampden was in the upper rear position. There was a folding seat for use when "gunning". Mark Postlethwaites "Hampdens in Focus" has some good interior photos.
    I believe it was normal to write WO/AG in the Log Book when assigned to this position. The lower rear gunner in "The Bin" stayed where he was. The Navigator / Bomb Aimer / Observer also had a fold down seat depending on his duty. It was supposed to be possible to remove an injured pilot from his seat by squeezing underneath him and pulling him back by the shoulders , then climbing over him to take his seat.... fun in an aircraft 3 ft wide!
    Best wishes
    James

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    The term is more usually written as WOp/AG and it was common to quite a few types of medium bombers and two seat fighters such as the Blenheim and Beaufighter. The Fleet Air Arm equivalent was TAG(Telegraphist/Air Gunner).

    John

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