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Thread: Halifax NP682, 426 Squadron, 9 February 1945

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    Default Halifax NP682, 426 Squadron, 9 February 1945

    Looking for any infortamtion on this Aircraft and crew who were lost on take off to attack Wanne-Eickel.

    Apologies for posting several similar requests on different aircraft at one time, I have been building questions for a little while and not had the chance to post, so this is kind of clearing a backlog. Any help is much appreciated.

    Alistair

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    Alistair,
    NP682, OW-R. Took off Linton-on-Ouse 0247. As the aircraft climbed the starboard outer engine caught fire. Before the bombs could be jettisoned the Halifax lost height and crash landed 0250 near Wetherby, Yorks..
    From BCL, Vol.6 page 73.
    Bill.

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    Thanks for the reply Bill, its all interesting information to add to my files.

    Alistair

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    Default Np-682 Ow-r

    The accident report does not mention an engine fire. It states that the engineer informed the pilot of the fuel warning light on the starboard outer. This engine was feathered and power added to the remaining engine. The sink rate continued and it was suggested by the flt/engineer to unfeather the engine and restart it. as this was taking place, the crew was ordered to crash stations and the Halifax hit the ground with the starboard wing low. The wireless op was able to get out through the top escape hatch, just foward of the mid upper turret. He walked forward and found the pilot, half hanging out of the cockpit with the coupe top missing and the fuselage was laying on the port side. They made their way and 100 feet from the fuselage the bomb load stated to go off. Judging by the photographs, there was not much left of the aircraft, but small bits and pieces. Although the accident was never solved, one wonders if the inner had cut, but the outer was also showing low fuel pressure and was feathered by mistake.

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