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Thread: PRU loss may 1942

  1. #1
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    Default PRU loss may 1942

    Hello,

    I received a new comprehensive document on my unknown airman loss 3 May 1942 in Saint Malo.

    http://www.absa39-45.com/Saint%20Malo/st-malo.htm

    The story is well written enough to trust this story.

    Finding nothing in the classical losses of the RAF, we can also seek the views of a mission PRU.
    The pilot's name is John Welmouth unknown, we have the name of a pilot flying under an assumed name ?
    Cordialement,
    Regards,
    Mit freundlichem Gruß,

    Dan

    Association Bretonne du Souvenir Aérien 39-45
    http://www.absa3945.com/

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    Hi Dan,

    I can find no 1 PRU losses dating from 03 May 42 and I'm not familiar with any 1 PRU pilot by the name of John Welmouth.

    Best Regards

    Andy Fletcher
    Per Speculationem Impellor ad Intelligendum

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    Hello,

    We can enlarge the dates of the loss of PRU between April 30th, 1942 and May 4th, 1942.
    Without the name given by this pilot John Welmouth, name which thinks at the moment unknown.
    Cordialement,
    Regards,
    Mit freundlichem Gruß,

    Dan

    Association Bretonne du Souvenir Aérien 39-45
    http://www.absa3945.com/

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    Hi Dan,

    I've widened the search to between 27 Apr 42 and 05 May 42 and there are no operational losses for 1 PRU during this period.

    Also no operational losses for 140 Sqn between these dates.

    The closest 1 PRU losses either side of 03 May 42 are:

    25 Apr 42 Spitfire AA795 (P/O Bourne) FTR from sortie to Amiens and Dijon area
    10 May 42 Spitfire AB127 (F/O Malcolm) FTR from sortie to Trondheim.

    The nearest loss to the 03 May 42 that would have involved flying over Brittany was on 20 May 42. Spitfire AB129 (Sgt Miller) FTR from a sortie to Bordeaux, Gironde, Rochefort, La Rochelle and La Pallice.

    Maybe he was a TacR pilot, do you know what type of aircraft he was flying?

    Best Regards

    Andy Fletcher
    Per Speculationem Impellor ad Intelligendum

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Fletcher View Post
    Hi Dan,

    I've widened the search to between 27 Apr 42 and 05 May 42 and there are no operational losses for 1 PRU during this period.

    Also no operational losses for 140 Sqn between these dates.

    The closest 1 PRU losses either side of 03 May 42 are:

    25 Apr 42 Spitfire AA795 (P/O Bourne) FTR from sortie to Amiens and Dijon area
    10 May 42 Spitfire AB127 (F/O Malcolm) FTR from sortie to Trondheim.

    The nearest loss to the 03 May 42 that would have involved flying over Brittany was on 20 May 42. Spitfire AB129 (Sgt Miller) FTR from a sortie to Bordeaux, Gironde, Rochefort, La Rochelle and La Pallice.

    Maybe he was a TacR pilot, do you know what type of aircraft he was flying?

    Best Regards

    Andy Fletcher
    Hello Andy,

    Thank you for the reply. So no losses with a mission PRU.
    Or it is a pilot Fleet Air Arm?

    In my story in French in this link it is not about the type of aircraft, the narrative well-written in 1946, immediately after the war.
    Http://www.absa39-45.com/Saint 20Malo/st-malo.htm
    Cordialement,
    Regards,
    Mit freundlichem Gruß,

    Dan

    Association Bretonne du Souvenir Aérien 39-45
    http://www.absa3945.com/

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    Dan just e-mailed me on this one last night and I have had a go at it. The story says the pilot was a tall, blonde Canadian by the name of John Welmouth lost over the esplanade of St. Malo, shot down by what I presume to be Flak. (Is that what DCA means in French?).

    I have found no trace of anyone by the name Welmouth/Wellmouth or even Weymouth anywhere, let alone an airman, Canadian or otherwise.

    I checked the CWGC via Geoff's search engine, Flight, the Toronto Star and Globe and Mail and no one of that name or names appears at all. There are also no fatalities for that location on or near that date. In fact, it appears to be an unusual name entirely, so it is probably a misspelling.

    This, of course, raises the possibility of it being a false name for a Free French or other nationality.

    I could find no Spitfire loss in the area that day, so it was possibly another a/c. The story implies a fighter, since only one body was found and no mention was made of others missing.

    The account of the incident is a great read, especially for its description of the punishment that was meted out to the brave locals who defied the Germans in order to honour the downed airman.

    It will require some real, out-of-the-box ideas for searching... a challenge!
    David

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    Default PRU lost

    Hello,

    Find the following name in the POW list,

    L6 POW 909 WELLWOOD N. J R/90177 RCAF

    Could be the the name was written by phonetique

    It is just a thought

    René

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    Any kind of spelling is possible, I suppose, however the story seems to be quite specific that the airman died and his body was recovered by the Germans. That is how the rest of the story follows about the local citizens' efforts to prepare the body for burial.

    Here is a translation of an extract from the story Dan provided in his link:

    "It was the afternoon of 3 May 1942 when an RAF aircraft on a reconnaissance mission that flew very low of the esplanade of the port, was hit by flak (defence contre avion). As we followed the turn of events by binoculars and watched the spectacle of the German soldiers celebrating and gesticulating, we knew a misfortune had occurred.

    "The body of the aviator, fished out of the water, was brought not long afterwards and deposited in the morgue at the St. Malo Hospital by the German troops, who established a guard near the body. (The airplane fell behind the Ile de Cezembre.)

    "It was a a big tall blonde Canadian airman of the RAF (RCAF?), named John Welmouth. The local people having been alerted by the flak guns, some people saw the Germans transport the body to the morque and soon everyone new about the presence of this hero at the hospital."
    Last edited by dfuller52; 14th November 2010 at 23:56. Reason: explain term DCA
    David

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