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Thread: Service Record assessment entries

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    Default Service Record assessment entries

    I'd appreciate some help in deciphering entries on a Service Record covering 1938 to 1960. The form includes three columns, labelled A, B and C in the 'Proficiency' section - why three columns? The entries in each column (in this case) are 'Sat', 'Sup' (or 'Supr), 'Ex' or 'VG'; mostly self-explanatory, but except for the 'Sup' - what did that mean? What is the scale of the terms, ie is Sat (satisfactory) the lowest, and Ex (excellent) the highest?

    Finally, after 1956 'Proficiency' changes to 'Assessments', and the above terms become numerical values, in this case ranging from 5 to 8. Again, what do the numbers mean?

    This record is for a non-aviator, but I assume the same applies across the board.

    TIA
    Brian
    PS. Just noticed an entry in the 'Unit' column that is obviously an abbreviation for an Egyption station - 'Risemb', any ideas?
    Last edited by Lyffe; 16th February 2008 at 10:26. Reason: Another abbreviation

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    Default

    "Sup'r" = Superior maybe?

    Max

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    Hi Brian
    Looking at my father's record in Col A when he was a AC1 in December 1940 he was u/t=untested, blank for B&C. Later years Col A was Supr=> I guess superior. Col B was sat and Col C was always blank. But I don't know what "A", "B" & "C" meant.
    Probably this doesn't help much but that was it for one other record from 1940/1947
    BillyBee

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    Hi Billy
    U/T actually means "Under Training" and would crop up for any trade or task before an individual qualified, it is not confined to Military Training but occurs wherever training is necessary and continues until the individual achieves qualification
    Regards
    Dick

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    Thanks Gents. It seemed such a simple question that I was sure someone would have a definitive answer.

    Incidentally forget about my 'Risemb' query - when the brain cells eventually clicked into gear I realised it was 'Disemb' = Disembarked! What really threw me was that he apparently left the UK for the Middle East on 26 Aug 1942, but didn't reach Egypt until 21 Noiv 1942 - seems a devil of a long time to be in transit, even by troopship.

    Brian

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    Hi All

    'Sup' may mean Supernumerary in which case he may not have been liable for an assessment as he wasn't on the establishment of the unit

    Malcolm

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    Lyffe;

    Concerning the long time spent on a troopship, I happen to be re-reading Churchill's history of the war right now. He talks at length about the difficulties in transporting men and equipment to the Middle East and beyond in 1941 and 1942, depending on the current state of naval matters in the Med. On many occasions, ships bound from the UK to the Middle East went via Halifax, then the Caribbean, then West Africa, and finally South Africa to the Red Sea. At each stop the ship could spend several days in port waiting for the next convoy to form up. I can only imagine the boredom of those on board.
    Last edited by Bill Walker; 2nd November 2008 at 19:53. Reason: spelling, again!

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    Thank you gentlemen - it was so long ago when I posted this thread I'd forgotten about it.

    Bill,

    Your post is especially interesting as it was not something I'd given any thought to. The Service Record was my father's, and although I knew he'd spent most of the war in the Middle East he never went into great detail - and certainly never described how he got there.

    I was fortunate in discovering a great deal about my parents when my mother was in hospital shortly before she died last year, but that was one question I never thought to ask, and now I'll never know.

    Brian

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    When I joined the service in the mid-60s, the assessments were on a scale of 1 (lowest) to 9 (highest). They were still under the three headings of A, B & C.

    Column A was an assessment of trade ability.

    Column B was an assesssment of supervisory ability and applied only to NCOs.

    Column C was an assessment of personal qualities.

    Hope that helps.

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    As this thread was started 9 months ago and there's been no definitive answer since, I think your post is of interest to everyone on this forum, Lauriebe.

    Many thanks,
    Brian

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