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Thread: Were screws used to build the Mosquito ?

  1. #1
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    Default Were screws used to build the Mosquito ?

    good evening to each of you,

    Could somebody here confirm that screws were used in the Mosquito ?

    Would seem logical, since it was a "wooden wonder"...

    Thanks in advance

    GC

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    Screws were used for local strength, but the main method of joining the wooden pieces was glue.

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    I would agree with Bill that glue was the prime means of holding the Mosquito together, although large bolts with nuts and special anti-shrinkage washers were used for major fastening jobs such as mainplane and tail surfaces to fuselage, etc. I had the privilege (?) of playing within the cockpit of an FB.6 as an 8/9 year old here in New Zealand about 159/60 (actually it was in HR339, amazingly the oldest of this marque to travel so far from home to New Zealand, and even more amazingly a former machine of 487 (RNZAF) Squadron.) My abiding memory of this cockpit (which lay unprotected outside in all weathers until it rotted away many years ago) was the large number of circular plywood discs used throughout this are for local strengthening wherever other components were attached to the cockpit wall (which was of course also the main fuselage structure), and the extensive copper bonding strips which connected all metal parts within the airframe and engine together. I also have a certain amount of experience of the construction of the Miles Whitney Straight light aircraft (vintage 1937) which was mainly glued together, with large bolts/nuts/washers for heavy stress areas, and much of the airframe and particularly the plywood skin joined together (obviously whilst the glue was drying) with lightweight steel staples and/or brads. You would think that the staples would have been removed after the glue had dried to save weight, but there must have been thousands of them and they were simply left in place - probably too labour intensive to remove them all.
    David D

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    Default Screws In Mosquito

    Thanks to both of you.

    I found screws on a mosquito crash site: what you say confirms that they most probably come from the A/C.

    GC

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    Interesting thread. Quite a bit can be learned of the construction techniques of the Mosquito on the AvSpecs website post detailing Glyn Powell's reconstruction/restoration of Mosquito FB.26 KA114. Mr. Powell uses the original construction techniqes and designs for the fuselage and wings, including the use of glue and screws in constructing the wood wing. I recently had an opportunity to look closely at a derelict Mosquito wing and also noted the use of a great many screws, very much as seen in this photo on the AvSpecs website showing Glyn Powell and assistants placing screws in the wing:

    http://www.warbirdrestoration.co.nz/mossie_06_07/wood/album/slides/image0018.html

    There seem to be comparitively fewer screws used in the fuselage construction, as the construction technique mostly depended on gluing the wood wrapped over a male mold.

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    Thanks for your answers,

    best regards;

    GC

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