Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: German interpretation of Allied squadron codes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default German interpretation of Allied squadron codes

    I always thought that my father's Lancaster bore the 49 Squadron code EA-P but having obtained the crash report, it seems to be identified as EA-Kokarde. ' Kokarde ' appears to be untranslatable. Did the German's use nomenclature like K-King or P-Peter for their records when identifying shot down Allied aircraft?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    271
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Could Kokarde = Cockade, or roundel?
    Ian Macdonald

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,638
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    In this instant isn't Kokarde merely the term for code or symbol (though Kokarde is literally cockard or emblem, it does get translated as roundel)

    So....."code EA"?

    I am sure someone with a better understanding of German can clarify. Just my penny's worth :)

    A

    EDIT: Ian's on the same wavelength but faster lol
    RAF Armoured Car Companies 1920-45 http://www.rafacciraq.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,638
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    The German phonetic alphabet:

    http://www.feldgrau.com/alphabet.html

    A
    RAF Armoured Car Companies 1920-45 http://www.rafacciraq.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stockholm
    Posts
    1,026
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    I have some copies of German telegrams to and from the Dulagluft at Wetzlar.

    They use the phonetic alphabet Amrit posted. "Kokarde" is used in lieu of roundel in identifying crashed Allied aircraft.

    Dave

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    250
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi,

    The term "EP-Kokarde" means that the Germans identified on a piece of fuselage wreckage the letters EP to the left of the roundel (or cockade, hence the German translation of this term), followed by the roundel. They apparently could not identify the individual aircraft letter code, probably because of the state of the wreckage.

    Cheers

    Rod
    Last edited by RodM; 26th September 2010 at 21:41.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aubers, France
    Posts
    2,372
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Hello,

    I concur with what the other board members write : Kokarde stands for cockade / roundel. When the German investigation team / recovery party arrived on spot, they noted any identification form they could (serial number, fuselage code, etc....). It's usually very helpful for us to confirm the ID of a crashed plane.

    Now, on a twisted sheet of metal, it's easy to misread a letter/figure for another, but in the case of a Squadron code, these are large letters, so confusion is less understandable. It may also be a typo in the message. Similarly, the German would use 'stern' (star) in case of a U.S. machine.

    Joss

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Thanks

    Many thanks to you all for deciphering this for me.
    Archivist49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •