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Thread: AIR OPERATING SECTION No.2 E&WS

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    Default AIR OPERATING SECTION No.2 E&WS

    Trying to make sense of my father's log I am curious to know the meaning of a red stamp in is log book that reads, "AIR OPERATING SECTION No.2 E&WS."

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    Hi David,
    Possibly it is number 2 Electrical and Wireless School, Yatesbury ?
    Ian

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    Many thanks, I think you are right.

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    David L,
    An Electrical & Wireless School was primarily a non-flying unit, but for realistic advanced instruction for wireless operators in particular, a small Flying Section would form a part of the organisation, usually equipped with DH Dominies and/or Bothas or such aircraft with RAF E&W Schools. Similar schools in the RCAF, RAAF, etc, would have had different aircraft types. In the RNZAF, their E&W School (no number, as only the one school) had two DH Dragons, also a DH86 in 1941/42, later a couple of Oxfords.
    David D

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    Hi David,

    I can confirm that it means 2 Electrical and Wireless School, Yatesbury. 88 Cyechoslovak WOPs passed their basic training there in late 1940.
    It was mostly ground training with morse in the classes but included several (around 3) first training flights on DH Dominies with the tasks "transmitting" and "receiving".

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Many thanks for your replies, that confirms what I have found out.


    Stationed at R.A.F. Yatesbury at the Air Operating Section No. 2 Electrical and wireless school the students busied themselves learning the theory of wireless and morse code. They were taught on the ground in classrooms and the De Havilland Dominie aircraft were used for the aerial training.

    From October 19th 1940 to November 8th 1940 my father made three flights in a De Havilland Dominie. These flights were logged as “Air Experience” and the student airmen received radio receiver training and transmitter tuning by calibration and back tuning to the transmitter.

    After Yatesbury he was at Ternhill for about eleven days, what was at Ternhill that would be of interest to a student AG/WO?

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    During his time at 2 Electrical and Wireless School, Yatesbury my father made four flights in a Dominie.

    My father's logbook states that the pilots of the Dominies were, Mr. Hancocks, Mr. Norman and Mr. Griiffiths.

    My question for the forum is, as these pilots are not listed with a military rank but as plain Mister, were Messers Hancocks, Norman and Griffiths civilian employees of the R.A.F.?

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    David L
    No doubt you will soon hear from others more knowledgeable than I on this subject, but I believe that many of the Air Observer Schools in the UK and the like were originally set up prewar by commercial interests (such as Scottish Aviation, De Havillands, Bristols, etc.) under contract to the Air Ministry and as such could employ civilian commercial pilots to fly the "flying classrooms" (Dominies, Ansons, etc) used by these organisations. These arrangements usually continued well into World War Two. Reasosn for this was that these gentlemen (employed as staff pilots) were often very experienced but were frequently over age for the RAF, and as they were not actually involved in flying instruction there was no objection to their being employed on such "bus driver" duties. Practically all the staff pilots flying simialr aircraft in Canada during WW2 with Air Observer Schools, etc, were also civilian employees of commercial organisations such as Canadian Pacific Airlines, with many American commercial pilots (United States citizens) crossing the border in 1940/41 to take up employement with these Canadian companie. LIkewise you will find these pilots listed in the flying logbooks of Commonwealth trainee observers, navigators and wireless operators as "Mr. (so and so).
    David D

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    If memory serves me right Morrie McGreal was a staff pilot at 2E&WS, Yatesbury and recalls his time there in his autobiography "A Noble Chance". Regards, Terry

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    Thanks for the clarification.

    D.

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