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Thread: RAF petrol

  1. #1
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    Default RAF petrol

    Hi,

    I would like to ask for following situation - if it was a normal procedure:

    when a bomber was prepared for a raid, appropriate amount of fuel and bombs and later the target was changed to the closer one - was a part of petrol loose off and more bombs added?

    In such a situation was the petrol re-used or just released into the ground?

    The last question is for the color of the petrol. From the war reminiscences I know it as "green" but on some other forums I ahve red a discussion it was blue...

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
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    Dear Pavel
    I cannot help you with the colour of the petrol, but this memory from my great uncle may amuse you....

    "Talking of chance lights reminded me of an episode at Upper Heyford. The various R.A.F. personnel on the station kept their cars in an open ended shed near the station. And I suppose there were a dozen cars there, so it was all open, no doors. And on D.R.O.s one day there was a notice there that the owners of cars that were left parked on the station were reminded that it was illegal to use aircraft fuel in their cars. And their cars, car tanks would be checked periodically by the Warrant Officer, and those cars that had coloured petrol in their tanks, the owners would be reported and disciplinary action would be taken. So no one, obviously, would dream of taking aviation fuel to put in their cars.
    But it so happened that while I was an instructor there, this chance light that I was talking about, was fed by a petrol generator driving a dynamo, and every night that there was night flying, an officer and sergeant had to be in attendance on the chance light, to, as I say, indicate to aircraft circling that it was alright to land when they put the chance light on, and turn it off as soon as the aircraft had come to a standstill. And this petrol engine that ran this, the chance light actually had uncoloured fuel, petrol. And it wasnt too difficult to drive ones little car up near the chance light, and with a little bit of rubber pipe the obvious happened. So the demand by the car owners to be allowed to do the night duty at this aerodrome, or field was most extraordinary,. and I dont know why!"


    Best wishes
    James

  3. #3
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    Many thanks for interesting reading James!

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  4. #4
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    Default Raf Petrol

    Hello ,
    After the war the aviation gasoline , known as AVGAS , had three colours , red for the 91/96 octane rate , blue for the 100/130 octane rate and green for the 130/145 octane. At thois moment the most used AVGAS is 100/130 octane rate.
    Alain12

  5. #5
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    Thanks Alain.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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