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Thread: Technical specifications: Spitfire F Mk IX

  1. #1
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    Default Technical specifications: Spitfire F Mk IX

    Hello,

    I am looking for some technical specifications of the Spitfire F Mk IX.

    In fact, I never find the same information if searching in different places. I kept the specifications that appeared most of the time. Here is what I'm looking for:

    Height: 11 feet, 5 inches
    Weight: 5610 pounds (empty)/7500 pounds (in charge)
    Max Speed: 408 mph at 25.000 feet
    Range: 980 miles with 175 gallons
    Climb Speed: 3125 feet per minute at sea level
    Ceiling: 42.500 feet

    Could somebody help and confirm these, or give the REAL specifications if these are not correct?

    Thanks a lot,

    Fox.
    Author of Crash in Bayeux - The Last Flight of Sergeant Ferguson (ISBN 979-10-91044-13-4) - www.facebook.com/crashinbayeux.

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    Default

    Fox,
    The specification you quote is obviously incomplete, although I presume that this is because you have provided only the contentious material. However even that which you provide is rather sketchy, as any performance data has to be given with appropriate qualifications, particularly when weight, range, speed, climb rate, endurance, etc., are concerned, as so many variables have a bearing on the figure quoted. I would suggest you study a copy of the pilots notes for this type (AP 1565J, P & L - PN) which covers the Spitfire Mk. IX, XI and XVI as fitted with Merlin 61, 63, 66, 70 or 266 (Packard) engines - already you can see the variety of engines involved which will have an effect on perfomance of any particular aircraft. Later models of the Mk. IX and XVI were usually delivered from the factory with an additional pair of ferry tanks (total capacity 75 Imperial gallons in case of "high-back" aircraft, or 66 Imperial gallons in case of "rear-view" aircraft - that is the bubble canopy versions) installed aft of the pilot's seat which increased the ferry range but were definitely NOT approved for combat - in fact it is stated that these tanks could only be used "at the discretion of the appropriate Area Commander", and normally their cocks were wired OFF. "If fitted in aircraft with 'rear view' fuselages, they must not be used in any circumstances."
    In fact I recommend that anybody interested in aircraft specifications and performance ALWAYS consult the relevant pilot's notes as these give so much insight into the practical operation of the machine that you become aware of the severe limitations of specifications normally quoted, which while admittedly having their uses, cannot provide the whole story of the limitations and advantages of operating any type of aircraft.
    David D

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    Default Test results

    Hello Fox
    You can also check the actual test results from here: http://www.spitfireperformance.com/spitfire-IX.html
    and remember, the speed and climb results of a/c of exactly same type varied even if planes had same equipment outfit and had more or less same weight.

    Juha
    Last edited by Juha; 2nd November 2010 at 22:47.

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    Default

    Okay, thanks for info.

    However, can you just confirm the height of the a/c as being 11 feet, 5 inches?
    Author of Crash in Bayeux - The Last Flight of Sergeant Ferguson (ISBN 979-10-91044-13-4) - www.facebook.com/crashinbayeux.

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    Default

    Fox,
    One specification I have seen for the Mk. IX indicates that "Height" was 12 foot, 7 3/4 of an inch!! However there were no qualifying remarks as to how this height was derived, but presume that this measurement was for an aircraft with tail down, one propller blade vertical, and undercarriage leg oleos at correct pressure. Alternatively it could be the height to the tip of the radio mast! See what I mean? You might have to get somebody to actually measure one of these aircraft to get real satisfaction. Actually one of the only real uses for having an aircraft height is so that you can be certain that a hangar door will permit a certain type of aircraft to pass safely underneath, and then you would have to be CERTAIN what the basis for the measurement was. A friend of mine was witha team that moved a very rare 1930 DH60 "Racing Moth" into a hangar, and because Tiger Moths had previously been stored in this buliding it was assumed that the older type Moth would pass through without any bother. WRONG! The original DH60 Moth had straight wings (no sweep back) and the dihedral angle was such that the upper wingtips brushed the beam of the door, very fortunately without damage.
    David D

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