Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: 23 Operational Training Unit

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Vlaardingen, Holland
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default 23 Operational Training Unit

    Are there any members who can provide me information about RAF No.23 Operational Training Unit?

    rafweg.org already provided me the following information:
    Formed at Pershore on 1 April 1941 within No 6 Group Equipped with Wellingtons, it trained night bomber crews for the rest of the war. On 11 May 1942 it was transferred to No 91 Group being reduced and then increased in status on a number of occasions until disbanding on 15 March 1944 with 'B' Flight being transferred to No 22 OTU.

    Perhaps somebody can answer me the following questions:
    Where the men only personally trained on their task and role in the airplane? Or were they already trained as a lasting crew?
    How long did the training last at an OTU?
    Are there any records to be found in the archives for the OTU's?

    Regards,
    Pieter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aubers, France
    Posts
    2,385
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Hello,

    I don't understand your first question. Before reaching O.T.U., each airman had been taught in his own trade, and received his flying brevet. But this training was done on trainer aircraft such as the Airspeed Oxford, for the pilots, and other types used as flying classrooms, to learn navigation, bomb aiming, wireless training, air gunner training...

    In O.T.U., the airmen "crewed up", i.e. making a crew together, usually of 5 comprising a pilot, a navigator, a bomb aimer, a wireless operator and an air gunner. This was for example the standard crew of a Wellington. From then on, they were flying as a crew, sometimes with an instructor, otherwise on their own. The aircraft was larger and more complex than what they had been using before, so it was a step forward.

    I'm not sure about the duration of a course, I'd say between 2 and 3 months, but I've seen longer periods, probably due to the weather.

    Next step was directly to a Squadron, in the beginning of WW2, then to (Heavy) Conversion Units when these were created. It was in HCU that a flight engineer and the second air gunner joined the crew, training being done on four engine bombers.

    The Operations Record Book of No. 23 O.T.U. in Pershore can be found in AIR 29/667 and 668 at The National Archives in Kew.

    HTH

    Joss
    Last edited by jossleclercq; 19th November 2010 at 19:29.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Vlaardingen, Holland
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jossleclercq View Post

    Quote deleted. Read and comply with the sticky on quote use.
    Ross
    That was exactly what I ment Joss. The ORB for 142 Squadron mentions for 26 october 1941:
    The following were posted to the unit from No.23. OTU with effect from today. Pilot, 1262819. SGT GREEN, H; Pilot NZ402174. SGT EMERSON, G; A/Obs. NZ 403787. P/O YATES, E.J.R.; WT/AG 1310507. SGT HARPER, W; WT/AG 1308640. SGT GILROY, W; A.G. 548744. SGT HOWARTH, J; Pilot R.76578. SGT INNES, S; Pilot R.78467. SGT PIPHER, W; A/Obs R.77507. SGT LENNOX, A; WT/AG 953388. SGT HENDERSON, R; WT/AG 1309716.SGT JELLY, A; A.G. 967059. SGT BARRIE, R; Pilot R64968. SGT WEST, D.C.; Pilot R77269. SGT PICHER, W.C.; A/Obs. 1058530. SGT MURRAY, G.P.; WT/AG 952261. SGT WHALE, H.K.; WT/AG 1255402. SGT McHUTCHINSON, H.J.; A.G. 972022. SGT TAIT, G.

    This seems to be three complete Wellington crews.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •