Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: 10 OTU Whitley V BD414 lost 3 Jun 1943

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default 10 OTU Whitley V BD414 lost 3 Jun 1943

    I am present researching the RCAF service of Danish Canadian Air Gunner Eric Haakon Neilson. He is lost in action on 3 June 1943 in Whitley V BD414 'J'. The aircraft took off 1045 hours from St. Eval on an anti-submarine patrol over the Bay of Biscay.

    In contemporary documents all that is mentioned is that it failed to return and that no communication was received from the aircraft. The crew was lost
    - Captain AUS.415212 Flight Sergeant Douglas Frederick Bavin (Pupil Pilot), RAAF
    - 2nd Pilot J.22032 Pilot Officer Harold Douglas Pepper (Pupil Pilot), RCAF
    - Navigator J.14637 Pilot Officer David Taylor Dorward (Pupil Navigator), RCAF
    - WT/AG 1385126 Sergeant Colin Arthur Richardson (Pupil WT/AG), RAFVR
    - B/A 136821 Pilot Officer Cecil Aspland Nicholds (Pupil B/A), RAFVR
    - A/G R.10786 Sergeant Eric Haakon Neilson (Pupil A/G), RCAF

    All were 10 OTU except for the 2nd pilot.

    In Tony Wood's claims list Uffz. Mannetstetter of 8./JG 2 is listed as having claimed a Whitley V on the position 7082 / 15 West: 500 m. at 20.14 hours on 3 June 1943. This position correspond to Long: 49.208336 Lat: -6.25 or about 100 km SW of Land's End. Hence, it seems likely that BD414 could be the victim Mannetstetter. As far as I can gather III/JG2 operated from Fontenay-le-Comte at the time.

    Would anyone know if other Whitleys were lost on this day? Or if others have matched this loss?

    Regards

    Mikkel Plannthin
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
    fb.me/britainsvictorydenmarksfreedom
    danishww2pilots.dk - a resource on Danish aircrew during the Second World War

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    926
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Mikkel:
    If it helps, Chris Goss makes no mention in 'Bloody Biscay' of a Whitley lost to KG 40 on that date.
    Regards:
    Robert

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thank you, Robert.

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
    fb.me/britainsvictorydenmarksfreedom
    danishww2pilots.dk - a resource on Danish aircrew during the Second World War

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    65
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Mikkel - I can send you the relavent page from the 10 OTU ORB for this day - there is little info however... No other Whitley losses that day from the St Eval detachment of 10 OTU.
    Elliott Smock
    ++ 44 (0)7890 892147

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default faebaekgaarden

    if Whitley v (BD414 'j') took of at 10:45 and were shot down 1 to 2 hours away from return to base at 20:15 that would have them airborne for over eleven hours. Is the whitlEy v capable of that ??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    692
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Hi Mikkel,

    If you try the National Archives of Australia you see the Aussie's pilot (Bavin) crash file is there but not on line. For the sum of $16.50 (AUSD) you can get it put on line, this may give you some clue as to its fate.

    Regards,

    John.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    @faabaekgaarden. Good question. According to the wikipedia article (which is not necessarily reliable) the ferry range of the a/c were 3,900 km and the top speed 370 km. I guess this this suggests that it could be possible.

    @john. Thank for this tip. I have made use of the NAA in many other cases and know of the source.

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
    fb.me/britainsvictorydenmarksfreedom
    danishww2pilots.dk - a resource on Danish aircrew during the Second World War

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    111
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    "if Whitley v (BD414 'j') took of at 10:45 and were shot down 1 to 2 hours away from return to base at 20:15 that would have them airborne for over eleven hours. Is the whitlEy v capable of that ?? "

    My uncle flew a/s patrols from 10 otu st. eval in may 1943. From his logbook and the orb's I have the norm for these patrols in the whiltley V was 8 to 10 hours. 10 hrs was very common. 11hrs would be pushing it although I did see a few in the orbs around 10 hr 35min.
    In remembrance of the crew of Halifax HR732
    51 Squadron Snaith - All LWT Leipzig 4 December 1943

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    692
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Hi,

    I have a conection to Sgt A Benson and Sgt R Rennick who took off 0949 on 14 June 1943 from St Eval with 10 OTU and they latter attacked two U-Boats, one of which sank (U 564) they were ETA return at 1950 but due to damage sustained by the aircraft they crashed in the sea at 1930 with a leaking fuel tank. They spent 3 days in a life raft before being picked up by a French fishing boat and returned to France to become pow for the next 2 years.

    So a 10 hour patrol looks to be common.

    Regards,

    John.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •