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RAF Hospitals

RAF Hospitals
Author: taff_s
Time Stamp:
16:32:13 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Hi all,

I gather all RAF bases had their own sick quarters for possible minor injuries but where were the most serious casualties cared for in Britain?

I read that one airman was repatriated and hospitalised at Wroughton Hospital. Were there many RAF Hospitals within the structure of all RAF Command Groups and were there specialised hospitals for different injuries?

Seeing that a lot of flying accidents were prelevant during training sorties and operational sorties alike it just made me curious as to where these airmen were treated.

Appreciative as always, cheers.

Steve



RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: WimpyT2560
Time Stamp:
16:43:13 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Hi Steve

I live in Wroughton, but sadly the RAF Hospital was demolished several years ago to make way for a housing estate (surprise, surprise). There was also another RAF Hospital at Ely (Cambridgeshire?). The Hospital at Wroughton had quite a distinguished career, including an important role in the repatriation of John McCarthy and Terry Waite, when they returned from Captivity. I work on Wroughton Airfield, which is about 3/4 mile away from the Hospital Site and this would have served the Airfield as well. The Airfield was home to 15MU and 76MU as opposed to be being an operational flying base. It was a sad day when the Hospital was closed, as the new hospital built for Swindon was too small right from the start!

If you need any other info on the Hospital, please let me know.

Cheers

Jonathan


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: phillipwalton
Time Stamp:
17:11:03 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Most RAF stations had a sick bay were as you say minor injuries and infections were dealt with. More serious injuries were dealt with at the nearest civilian hospital. A good example is Douglas Bader who was taken to the Royal Berkshire Hospital were his legs were amputated. Military hospitals normally came under thr R.A.M.C. but dealt with casualties from all services and sometimes allies and foes. My mother was an assistant nurse in a military hospital and one of her patients was a Polish pilot.

In overseas theatres a field hospital was sometimes provided (army?) or a hospital ship (navy?). The U.S. ARMY air force was of course part of their army. Several large mental hospitals were taken over by the military particulary at the time of D-Day but to serve as conventional hospitals

Even the "Guinea Pig Club" came under a civilian hospital. The Queen Victoria Hospital at East Grinstead.


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: Chris Charland (Guest)
Time Stamp:
17:46:36 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
G’day Taff

Here is a list of hospitals in the U.K. and Iceland circa September 1944.

Cheers%85Chris

Central Medical Establishment -London -No. 28 Group

H.Q. Medical Training Establishment and Depot - Harrogate - No. 28 Group

Medical Stores Depot - Hartlebury - No. 40 Group

No. 55 Mobile Field Hospital - Snailwell - No. 2 Group

No. 56 Mobile Filed Hospital - Down Ampney - No. 46 Group

Princess Mary’s R.A.F. Hospital - Halton - No. 24 Group

R.A.F. Hospital - Reykjavik - Iceland (Group)

R.A.F. Hospital - Cosford - No. 24 Group

R.A.F. Hospital - Ely - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. Hospital - Rauceby - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. Hospital St. Athan - No. 24 Group

R.A.F. Hospital - Wroughton - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. Officer’s Hospital - Blackpool - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. General Hospital - Lochnaw - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. General Hospital - Evesham - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. General Hospital - Church Village - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. General Hospital - Northallerton - No. 28 Group

No. 8 R.A.F. General Hospital - No. 85 Group, Tactical Air Force

R.A.F. Medical Rehabilitation Unit - Halton - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. Neurological Hospital - Matlock - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. Physiological Laboratory - Farnborough - No. 28 Group

R.A.F. Station Hospital - Uxbridge - No. 28 Group



RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: WimpyT2560
Time Stamp:
18:29:17 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Another Hospital close to the one at Wroughton (within a mile) was the American one at Burderop Park. This then became a school and then a Mental Hospital. It was taken over a number of years ago by a Building Society who have a high security centre there. Also in Wiltshire was a small Hospital at RAF Yatesbury, near Calne.

Jonathan


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: jstynes
Time Stamp:
19:20:36 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
[font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON 22-Aug-07 AT 07:22 PM (GMT)[/font][p]Hospitals within a Group or Command would come under the Principal Medical Officer (PMO) and his staff of that formation. He in turn would be responsible to the Director General Medical Services (RAF)The RAF also had Field Hospitals (see Chris Charlands list) in the 1980's I exercised with No1 RAF War Hospital in Germany. I am pretty sure that there was no link in the chain of command to the RAMC - that is until approx 1995 when the whole military system was 'reorganised' by a RN Commodore. Overseas Air Forces e.g. RAFME and later RAFG also had their own hospitals who were responsible to their own PMO

John


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: Dakota
Time Stamp:
19:37:25 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Here's some supplemental gen.

Cheers...Chris

Central Medical Establishment - London -No. 28 Group was under direct control of the Air Ministry (D.G.M.S.) for (medical) and administration

Medical Stores Depot - Hartlebury - No. 40 Group was under direct control of the Air Ministry (D.G.M.S.) for (medical) and administration

R.A.F. Physiological Laboratory - Farnborough - No. 28 Group was directly controlled by the Air Ministry (D.G.M.S.) for (medical) and administration

* One other unit I failed to mention, was the R.A.F. Institute of Pathology and (Tropical Medicine) which was located at Halton.

Cheers...Chris



RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: taff_s (Guest)
Time Stamp:
20:33:44 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your contributions, brilliant!

I wonder how many military hospitals are still in use today?

I know RNH Haslar is due to close or even is closed now, so there can't be many if any with their doors still open.

Cheers.

Steve


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: phillipwalton
Time Stamp:
21:10:33 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
Many wartime hospitals were only temporary but continued in use until the 1950's none are in use today and only one remains in its wartime state. This is Croome Park in Worcestershire which is now under the National Trust and can be viewed on www.24hourmuseum.org.uk


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: phillipwalton
Time Stamp:
23:16:06 Wednesday, August 22, 2007
Post:
In my last post I should have said "no wartime RAF hospitals are in use today". I do believe that many military hospitals were absorbed into the NHS when it was created in 1948.


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: Tony Broadhurst (Guest)
Time Stamp:
23:50:27 Thursday, August 23, 2007
Post:
Steve, Phil and all,

From "The Airfields of Lincolnshire since 1912" (Blake, Hodgson and Taylor / MCP):

NOCTON HALL --- 1 km SE of Lincoln.

Nocton Hall was taken into Air Ministry ownership at the outbreak of the Second World War as a possible extension of the RAF Hospital at Cranwell. However, the Hall's size and layout precluded its satisfactory use as a hospital and the RAF took over the mental hospital at Rauceby instead. The Army used the Hall as a casualty clearing station until 1943 and the following year it was taken over by the Americans who commenced the construction of the US Army Seventh General Hospital. In November 1947 the Hospital was taken over by the RAF and after extensive reconstruction in 1955 its facilities were gradually extended, until by 1969, Nocton Hall was able to offer all the routine facilities of a modern General Hospital. Unfortunately. as part of the rationalisation of RAF medical facilities Nocton Hall closed on 31st March 1983.

RAUCEBY --- 3 km WSW of Sleaford.

RAF Hospital 1940 to 1947.

There are eight pages describing the history and various units based at RAF Cranwell but the only reference to medical facilities are:

"--- on 5th February 1920 the Royal Air Force Cadet College and School of Technical Training for Boy Mechanics was opened at Cranwell. At that time the station was divided into three areas: East Camp housed the Boy's Wing and Technical training Departments; West Camp comprised the Cadet College, flight sheds and the lighter than air sections; the third area contained two airship hangars and a number of barrack blocks which were used as an isolation hospital when the need arose."

Hope this is of interest, Tony



RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: taff_s (Guest)
Time Stamp:
12:49:10 Friday, August 24, 2007
Post:
Hi everyone,

Thanks again for the interesting replies, it seems a facinating subject to pursue.

Obviously, many servicemen and women alive today owe their lives to the skills and determination of doctors and nurses of that period. Even today the nursing profession is just as committed as the ever. Shame the resources are directed in other directions than nursing staff themselves. But that is another matter.

Cheers.

Steve


RE: RAF Hospitals
Author: jonny956
Time Stamp:
17:03:30 Saturday, August 25, 2007
Post:
Steve,

Haslar was the last true military hospital to close its doors.

As someone who is still in uniform, it is a crying shame what the last Conservative Govt did to the military medical services. We now rely on overcrowded civilian hospitals (with a spattering of military staff) and the Reserves.

Rgds

Jonny