Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Crew position and survivability for Short Stirling

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    306
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default Crew position and survivability for Short Stirling

    Hi,

    In The Crucible of War 1939-1945, The Official History of the Royal Canadian Air Force Volume III there is a table of Crew position and survivability in Bomber Command Aircraft, January-June 1943. It includes survival rate for the different crew positions of Lancaster, Halifax and Wellington bombers. For Halifax 29 per cent of the crew members survived being shot down but corresponding figure for the Lancaster was just 10,9 per cent.

    The figures are taken from Bomber Command Headquarters, ‘An examination of the emergency escape arrangements from Bomber Command operational aircraft’, 19 May 1945, DHist 181.003 (D4598). Is there anyone with a copy of this? I am interested in the survival rate for the different crew positions of the Short Stirling.

    Thanks in advance
    Peter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 43 Times in 40 Posts

    Default Re: Crew position and survivability for Short Stirling

    Quote Originally Posted by phasselgren View Post
    For Halifax 29 per cent of the crew members survived being shot down but corresponding figure for the Lancaster was just 10,9 per cent.
    Peter,
    Interesting. Surely the actually likelihood of being shot down in a particular type of aircraft also needs to be factored in before any true results can be reached?
    Andy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    306
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default Re: Crew position and survivability for Short Stirling

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Marden View Post
    Peter,
    Interesting. Surely the actually likelihood of being shot down in a particular type of aircraft also needs to be factored in before any true results can be reached?
    Andy
    Andy,
    Yes, during the war much of the focus was on the loss rate for each aircraft but these figures focus on the possibility to escape and I guess it was not possible to do this before the end of the war. The Lancaster was a great aircraft but the rear gunner had only 8% chance to survive when being shot down.
    Peter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aubers, France
    Posts
    2,521
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 23 Times in 22 Posts

    Default Re: Crew position and survivability for Short Stirling

    Hello

    I seem to remember there's a little piece in the last edition of "The Bomber Command War Diaries" about crew survivability. It was not in my earlier edition (Penguin). It explained that aircrews had a better chance of survival in a "doomed" Halifax than in a "doomed" Lancaster and this was due to lesser escape hatches in the Lancaster than in the Halifax, or less practical. Introduction / retrofit of additionnal escape hatches on Lancasters would have meant a slower input in operational Squadrons, and so the decision was made not to do it. The main point was that the loss rate of Lancasters was lesser than the loss rate of Halifax.

    Joss

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •