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Thread: POW and Evaders Database Work

  1. #201
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    Default Re: Today’s POW Puzzle – Help Please

    Hi Peter and others,

    An interview with ‘Jum’ Falkiner which may be of interest
    http://australiansatwarfilmarchive.u...raser-falkiner
    https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C87827

    Joss, Falkiner’s NAA service files may include his PoW questionnaire although unfortunately they have not been digitised yet. Also, ‘Tiny’ was a common Australian nickname for any tall pilot, am not sure whether this was a shared sense of humour across all services or with other nationalities!

    Regards, Drew

  2. #202
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    Default Re: Today’s POW Puzzle – Help Please

    Hello Drew

    Thanks for your information. I agree that he already had his nickname "tiny" when he was posted to the Squadron, so had probably acquired it during his initial training in Australia. As you say, only his service file would reveal his training syllabus (I haven't accessed the two links you provide, yet), with ITS/ITS in Australia, but what of EFTS/SFTS.

    I have downloaded / paid for / service files in the NAA, but I don't remember having found a copy of a PoW questionnaire in it, in the shape of the document held in Kew. Same for service files of R.C.A.F. airmen. They may have a description / statement about capture and PoW times.

    In some cases, when there's no PoW questionnaires in the WO344 series at Kew, it's because the airman / serviceman was repatriated back, on medical grounds.

    Combat reports he filed :
    http://discovery.nationalarchives.go...ils/r/D7450677 (for the day he didn't return)
    http://discovery.nationalarchives.go...ils/r/D7450652

    A probable relative ? Warrant Officer T K Falkiner (service number Aus 400701). Service: RAAF [Royal Australian Air Force] Evasion from Greece to Cyprus. in http://discovery.nationalarchives.go...ls/r/C14083823

    Joss

  3. #203
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    Default Re: Today’s POW Puzzle – Help Please

    Hello,

    AUS400701 Travers Kilfera FALKINER RAAF, was an older brother of Fraser FALKINER.

    Sgt Travis Kilfera FALKINER RAAF was shot down on 7/8 November 1943, in No.38 Squadron Wellington XIII MP705. The aircraft ditched off the island of Sifnos and the crew paddled ashore. They were protected by the locals, and a Royal Navy boat later picked them up and returned them safely to Cyprus.

    See: http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/sho...737#post113737 - see link to obituary of pilot (R. W. Adams RCAF) of Wellington MP705, Post #9.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 17th May 2021 at 00:03.

  4. #204
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    Default Re: Today’s POW Puzzle – Help Please

    Joss

    400701 Travers Kilfera Falkiner was indeed Fraser Falkiner's brother. His A705 and A9300 have been digitised on the naa.gov.au website.

    Regards

    Simon
    Researching R.A.F. personnel from the North East of England

  5. #205
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    Default Re: Today’s POW Puzzle – Help Please

    Hello

    Thanks Col and Simon.

    from http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/sho...861#post121861 and Mojmir's 2016 message, I understand that Fraser Falkiner was repatriated back, when a prisoner of war. Hence no PoW questionnaire in the WO344 series. And Mojmir lists him in the Guinea Pig club, which would go towards the same direction, if he became a member for medical treatment after his return from German PoW camps.

    Joss

  6. #206
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    Default Two More "Missing" POWs For You To While Away An Hour

    Hello All,

    Flt Lt George Eric Ball, DFC, RAF (39842) has 3 entries.
    1, he is shown as being in Camp 29 in Italy – no date.
    2, he is shown as being in L3 POW #2319 – no date.
    (these two entries are compatible) - but
    3, WO416 has him lost at Trondjem (sic) and in L1 #2319.
    Which is the correct version?

    WO 416 has 2303720 Sgt George E Bewer, was lost over Essen (no date) and is in L7 #553.
    I can’t find him anywhere. Surname and Service Number both look a bit "odd"?

    Can anybody help? I've been staring at a screen too long!

    TIA
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  7. #207
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    Default Re: Two More "Missing" POWs For You To While Away An Hour

    Peter

    2303720 Sgt George E Bewer - 2203720 George Edward Bower

    See: http://www.rafcommands.com/database/...R&qnum=2203720

    Regards

    Simon
    Researching R.A.F. personnel from the North East of England

  8. #208
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    Default Re: Two More "Missing" POWs For You To While Away An Hour

    Peter

    With regards to Flt Lt George Eric Ball, DFC, RAF (39842) - he became a P.o.W. after Hurricane V7716 force-landed in a sand-storm in the Western Desert.

    See: http://bbm.org.uk/airmen/Ball.htm

    So Number 1 and Number 2 are seemingly correct, and Number 3 a typo for somewhere in the WD region?

    Regards

    Simon
    Researching R.A.F. personnel from the North East of England

  9. #209
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    Default Re: Two More "Missing" POWs For You To While Away An Hour

    Simon,
    VMT for that info. Much appreciated.
    While looking for El-Ezzeiat yesterday, and today V7716 coming down in the bundoo I was reminded of my first tour, in the mid-1950’s, at El Adem as a Met airman. “We” looked after, and had the H/F W/T comms with, a number of Desert Outstations for the fledgling Libyan Govt. They were Derna, Cyrene, Adgedabia, Giarabub, Jalo, and Kufra. We did a lot of their admin and went on the inspection/re-supply convoys. So I’ve seen a fair bit of Libya! There were untold thousands of tons of unexploded/abandoned munitions (and mines!) all over Cyrenaica – probably still are! I was 2nd Nav on the Desert Rescue column for, as S Nav O explained to me, HQ ME in Cairo said we had to have one and you get the chart/map the right way up most of the time! The desert was still littered with wrecks, but if – by then – the local ‘scrappies’ hadn’t had them away you could reckon they were fairly lethal!!
    Tks again.
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  10. #210
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    Default Four More Problematical POWs

    Hello All,
    Four more I can’t do anything with!
    Sgt George Jones, RAF, POW in Stalag IVB Muhlberg #368 is all WO416 will tell me. Needle in Welsh haystack!
    Plt Off Georges Habik, RAF, 64 Sqdn. Again, that’s all there is! Mediterranean French origin possibly?
    2/Lt Glen Marshall Herrington, RAF(USAAF), Cap 1943-01-03, s/n 0728210, In Stalag IXC Bad Sulza #42693. Odd combination, but might have been USAAF on a familiarisation/instructional flight with the RAF.
    7904031 Sgt Gordon Beesum, RAF, Stalag XXIIA Linburg s d Lahn #76338.
    Mind is in neutral this morning. Can’t think of any likely typo letter replacement(s) to steer me in the right direction.
    Anybody got any clues? TIA.
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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