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Thread: Air Crashes at Sea Civilian War Dead CWGC

  1. #61
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    Hello 'Ringo'

    The reason your grand fathers name came up in this thread was we were trying to determine who the person named 'H D Anderson DFC2 listed as killed by the CWGC in 1942 was. We suggested

    Henry Douglas ANDERSON ex RFC as a possible candidate.

    You can help us by letting us know what do you know of your grandfather, did he live on past World War 2, or was he a wireless operator with RAF Ferry Command in 1942 and lost at sea with an aircraft?

    Welcome to the board, try not use the message quote option as it just fills up the forum with repeated text, cheers

    Dennis Burke
    Dublin
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  2. #62
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    Hello Dennis

    First of all my name is Edward Chilcott, had some trouble registering for this website and ended up using a nickname.

    HDA is ex RFC but happily was not lost during WW2, but went on to live healthily until 1969. In fact he was not in active service in WW2 as he was too old to be called up and was employed in essential occupation.

    He enrolled in RFC in 1918 and a year later he sailed on HMS Riviera (which is reported to have been adapted for use as the first aircraft carrier) to the Dardenelles to fight for the White Russians against the Bolsheviks. Returned to England via Malta and France in May 1919. In the RFC his Aviators Certificate was no 7660 and issued 13 March 1918.

    In 1919 he joined a food provision merchants, John Loudon and Co, and remained with them until he retired in 1969, 50 years of service.

    During WW2 he worked closely with the Ministry of Food and after the war he set up the importing of Danish bacon products and was also one of the first civilians to travel to Poland to establish links between Poland and the UK. In 1969 he was awarded the Order of the Polonia Restituta, a highly regarded award for a non Polish citizen.

    His only active involvement in WW2 was in the Home Guard in London.

    The information earlier in the thread re his DOB is correct and he died 27 November 1969. In 1918 he lived in Blackheath and died whilst living in Eastbourne.

    My mother Angela, aged a youthful 79, recollects that other than his time in the Dardenelles he may have been in service in France. From information she obtained from National Archives (inc his service record) he seems to have had a few postings with various "wings" and squadrons and she also thinks he may have been involved in a crash, but escaped unscathed. We do not believe he was awarded DFC.

    Hope this is of interest in your enquiries, we have a lot of photos, docs etc, let me know if you want any additional details.

    Best Wishes

    Edward Chilcott

  3. #63
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    Hello Edward,

    welcome to the board (don't mind me, I get all hepped up when people use only nicknames on forums.)

    Glad to read that our Anderson was not your grand father.

    As he was RFC, you can get his service record from this link:
    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/raf-officers-ww1.htm
    for a few small pounds, we can help you with any confusing codes etc on it.

    Our gentleman was R D Anderson then.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  4. #64
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    Default Catalina 02915 11 Jan 1945, North Carolina

    Whilst browsing my copy of Ocean bridge this morning (as one does!) I noticed this aircraft loss,
    Catalina 02915 which crashed coming out of Elizabeth City, North Carolina on 11 January 1945 (12th in the book). The appendix in Ocean Bridge lists teh crew as Peter Harry Nataros, and he is listed on CWGC website and four Russian airmen, who are not named.

    So I popped into ancestry.com and they have death certs for North Carolina and the names of the Russians were:
    Lieutenant Afanasie Borodin
    H N Chikov
    Captain W M Levin
    Senior Lieutenant D M Medvedev

    Deaths of all five are registered at Nixonton, Pasquotank County. All deaths dated 11th January)

    All the Russians are listed as being 'removed' under the field 'buried, cremated, removed'. I wonder is there a Russian cemetery they were buried in somewhere?
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  5. #65
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    Hello,

    The aircraft was a Naval Aircraft Factory PBN-1 Nomad (a NAF-built version of the Catalina).

    Development of the changes (to the PBN Nomad), proceeded slowly and the first of the 156 aircraft ordered was not delivered until February 1943, with the last of the lot accepted in March 1945. Only 17 PBN Nomads were delivered to the US Navy, the remainder of this production batch had been ferried to Elizabeth City and delivered to Russian crews for delivery to the USSR.

    See:
    PBY Catalina in Action.
    Scarborough,W.E Capt. USN. (Ret.).
    Carrollton:Squadron Signal Pubs.,1983.
    p.36.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 1st May 2013 at 11:21.

  6. #66
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    While browsing C Christies Ocean Bridge the other day, I noted that he had a note for the first aircraft in his Appendix B of lost aircraft, that there might be a third person on Hudson T9450.
    Googled the pilots name and lots of 1941 newspaper stories are scanned and readable
    The third person was a Bulgarian born pilot named, Christopher George, he was the son of a Bulgarian General, Kosla Gheorghieff, who was killed in 1925, His son George had moved to America and become a pilot.
    http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=3206,4364318
    http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=6543,3668262

    Incase this helps anyone.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  7. #67
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    Hello Dennis: I was so glad to stumble upon your post of Jan 2013 about the crash of a Hudson bomber in Halifax Harbour, Dec 1942. The pilot, Harry Prentice was my grandfather (although I never got to meet him since I was born in 1960). Our family, for many years, had the Halifax Herald clipping recounting the accident, but it has somehow gone missing. I have also tried to find it on Ancestry but to no avail. I wonder if you might be able to pass on how you came upon the scanned article. My grandfather was a colourful character, by all accounts, and a very skilled pilot with more than 20 years flying experience in just about every aircraft out there at the time. I would greatly appreciate any help in locating your source. I am not hugely comfortable with searching on Ancestry and with filtering correctly for information. Thanks, Jean MacFarlane

  8. #68
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    Hi Jean, sorry for missing your message, I will look again and try figure out where I would have found that.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  9. #69
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    One of the passengers on Douglas DC-3 G-AGBB flying from Lisbon to London with Leslie Howard was an extraordinarily brave man called Wilfred Israel. Heir to pre-war Berlin's oldest department store, but with dual British & German nationality, from the moment Hitler came to power he did everything possible to save the lives and freedom of Jews with no thought for his own safety. He was a close friend of my father, who was one of the first he saved by warning him in 1933 that he was on a list for arrest, having fought back successfully when attacked in the street by Nazi thugs. He told my father he must leave Germany at once. How did he know? It appears he may already have been gathering information on Gestapo activity for a contact at the British Embassy. He was the prime mover behind the Kindertransport that saved over 10,000 Jewish children from Germany & Austria and also saved almost every one of his own firm's Jewish employees by paying them off with 2 years' pay and telling them to leave Germany at once. He himself was doubly at risk, being both Jewish and gay, but he remained in Berlin until 1939 and even after coming to London, returned to Germany once more to get a last trainload of Jewish children out. In 1943 he was sent to Lisbon to negotiate rescue of thousands of Jews who had fled to Spain and Portugal. The regimes in both countries had resisted German pressure to hand these people over but it seemed likely they would give in eventually. Wilfred Israel succeeded in negotiating visas for many and was returning to London on the ill-fated BOAC flight, which was shot down by 8 German fighters. It is at least possible that he was as big a target as Howard, and Lisbon certainly had no shortage of Nazi spies.

  10. #70
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    I just got to the Ancestry.com scan of the three pages of the printed register for 'AIR CRASHES AT SEA" and blast me if they don;t all have a printed note about the location of their death!!!! Why did they not retain that information in the scanning process!

    For William McLean for example it says in addition to the bit currently on the website:
    "in aircraft crash in Irish sea"


    For Peter Noel Loxley they printed on paper:
    LOXLEY, PETER NOEL, age 39; First Secretary, Foreign Office. Son of Mrs. Loxley, and of the late Capt. Arthur Noel Loxley, R.N.; husband of Elizabeth Lavender Loxley, of the Mill House, Longparish, Andover, Hampshire. Member of the staff of the British Delegation to the Crimea Conference. killed in a flying accident on the way to the Crimea, 1 February 1945

    Whereas the website goes with:
    Rank:Civilian
    Date of Death:01/02/1945
    Age:39
    Regiment/Service:Civilian War Dead British Delegation to the Crimea Conference.
    Reporting Authority:AIR CRASHES AT SEA
    Additional Information:First Secretary, Foreign Office. Son of Mrs. Loxley, and of the late Capt. Arthur Noel Loxley, R.N.; husband of Elizabeth Lavender Loxley, of the Mill House, Longparish, Andover, Hampshire. Member of the staff of the British Delegation to the Crimea Conference. Buried in Imtarfa Cemetery, Malta



    Buried in Imtarfa Cemetery, Malta.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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